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Civil Society Organizations and Permanent Missions in Geneva Join Forces for a Childhood Free from Violence

As a lead up to the 2018 Malta High-Level Global Conference that took place in June, Arigatou International Geneva co-sponsored an event on 24 May 2018 together with the Working Group on Children and Violence. The Working Group gathers a number of NGOs in Geneva under the umbrella of Child Rights Connect, to promote actions that prompt violence prevention strategies and protect children who are vulnerable.

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Consultative Meeting in Lausanne, for the Multi-Religious Study on the Contributions of Religious Communities to the Convention on the Rights of the Child

On November 20, 2019, the international community will mark the 30th anniversary of the adoption of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC30), the most comprehensive treaty on the rights of children which has been ratified by virtually all UN Members States.

The enormous success of the CRC has resulted in numerous laws being enacted including national constitutions, and policies, programs, and budgets being adopted that benefit children. It has also spurred notable achievements in health, education and child protection all of which have improved the lives of all children in many parts of the world.

For this occasion, Arigatou International, in close collaboration with the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Violence against Children (SRSG) has initiated a Study from a multi-religious perspective with experts on child rights, religious leaders and scholars that includes a review of the CRC since its adoption. The Study is also being developed in collaboration with UNICEF and other key partners.

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INSPIREd Faith Communities in India: Second Roundtable Discussion on Nurturing Values and Spirituality in Early Childhood for the Prevention of Violence

“All of us know what has gone wrong and all of us know what needs to be done to end violence against children, but the question is do we have the courage to do something about it?”

With these words, Dr. Krishnaraj Vanavarayar, Chairman of Bharativa Vidva Bhavan, launched the National Roundtable Discussion on Nurturing Values and Spirituality in Early Childhood for the Prevention of Violence that took place on 11 – 12 April 2019 in Coimbatore, India.

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INSPIREd Faith Communities in Kenya – Fourth Roundtable on Nurturing Values and Spirituality in Early Childhood for the Prevention of Violence

With a strong call to action to work together for a future of dignity, prosperity and peace for children, Dr. Daniel Muvengi, Regional Director of World Vision Kenya, opened the National Roundtable Discussion on Nurturing Values and Spirituality in Early Childhood for the Prevention of Violence that was held on 28 and 29 May, 2019, in Nairobi, Kenya.

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Strengthening Leaders in Times of Covid-19

“Everyone needs to be educated ‒ the leaders, the public, the children, the youth, the elite and the masses. Formal education as well as non-formal education has a great role to play in bringing about peace and disarmament in the present-day world. We are all members of one human family. United we stand and divided we fall.” 

Dr. M. Aram, 

Founder President, Shanti Ashram

With Dr. Aram’s words as a reference line for the discussions, the series of webinars titled “Leaders Dialogue – Active Peace Building for Community Cohesion in the Midst of COVID-19” kicked off on Tuesday, 22 July 2020. The Leaders Dialogue aimed at listening to one another and sharing notes from leadership experiences, guided by the premise that leaders multiply leaders. In unprecedented times like the COVID 19 Pandemic or in everyday encounters, such dialogue creates an environment of reflection, mutual learning and recommitment to action, active peacebuilding, and community cohesion. 

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The Challenges Facing Educational Systems

I would like to share nine (9) brief points. The first three are conceptual and addresses what we mean by social cohesion. The second three points relate to my broad diagnosis of the root causes of deadly conflict and violence, which is the anti-thesis of social harmony. Lastly, I conclude by sharing three modest suggestions as to how we can contribute to building a culture of social cohesion.

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