Blog

By Barry van Driel

From July 6 to July 15,1938 more than 30 countries gathered in Évian-les-Bains in France to discuss the plight of German and Austrian Jews, and to look for solutions for a growing refugee problem. The Jews of Germany (and Austria) had been stripped of their basic human rights and were desperate to find safe havens. Multiple states had migration quotas in place but none (the Dominican Republic was willing to take refugees but for large sums of money) were willing to raise their quotas to take in these refugees. Reasons given were the aftermath of the Great Depression, unemployment, etc. Though many representatives were sympathetic to the plight of the Jewish refugees in their rhetoric, their message was clear: this is not our problem and we take no responsibility; all of this mixed into a lethal cocktail of fear, hatred and distrust.

By Prof. Dr. Alicia Cabezudo*

Education for peace and respect for human rights become particularly relevant today as the values that they entail are conflicted by daily violence, the horrors of war and the slow destruction of values such as solidarity, cooperation and respect for the other – situations that shake us daily.

"I had a professor once who used to say there are two things you should read every day: the Bible and the New York T…

I strongly believe that children have an innate potential for spiritually. We need to listen carefully to children s…

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